Posts Tagged ‘wedding patterns’

Wedding Trends: Top 5 Wedding Patterns 2013

January 29, 2013

In TDSWhite’s (the dynamic duo of Matthew and Trevor) last post, they delved into all things wedding color schemes for 2013. In this post, they let us know their take on the top five wedding patterns for 2013: 

Here are the top wedding patterns for 2013 in random order:

1. Gingham: Yes, that picnic blanket / Italian restaurant tablecloth pattern of overlaying stripes is “in” this year. When choosing a gingham wedding pattern, brides-to-be must be aware that a gingham pattern is not a plaid pattern, though both look quite similar at first glance. Gingham is visually simple and plaid is visually more complex upon closer inspection.

Both Gingham and plaid patterns have a history stemming back to the late 17th century. Gingham is usually made with woven horizontal and vertical lines in cotton. When these lines cross, they create a saturation of color at the intersections. Plaid is usually made with wool and has more intricate and varied line thickness and color combinations.

2. Chevron: Another pattern likely to be confused with a close cousin in the design world is the chevron pattern. People often consider a chevron pattern to be interchangeable with a zigzag pattern. However, they are not the same.

A zigzag pattern has sharp repeated peaks and valleys. A chevron has one peak repeated downward. This creates a column of peaks – a stack of upside down V’s on top of one another.

When a chevron column is placed beside another chevron column the two should not match. The colors should be reversed or the chevron itself should be slightly higher or lower than the adjacent chevron. A chevron pattern has many different looks ranging from very thin to bold and thick. Also, any combination of thick and thin chevrons used together can create an interesting pattern. It can be one solid color against a background or various color combinations may be used.

Mint Chevron Custom Wedding Invitations
Mint Chevron Custom Wedding Invitations by TDSwhite

3. Paisley: A Paisley pattern has been a fashion staple of men’s ties and women’s silk scarfs for many years. A paisley pattern is made up of varying size decorative comma-shaped designs that range from simple outlines to those with elaborate, intricate details. The color possibilities are varied too. A paisley pattern can be as simple as one color in the foreground against a background color or the designer can employ a variety of colors throughout the design.

Orange Pattern Gingham Check Groom's Tie
Orange Pattern Gingham Check Groom’s Tie by TDSwhite

4. Polka Dots: Do not underestimate the power of a polka dot! A polka dot design is a simple uniform pattern of dots placed over a solid background color. In a particular polka dot design, the dots themselves can be the same color throughout the design or they can be a mixture of different colors.

These little design spots can create a wide range of effects. Itsy bitsy, teenie-weenie polka dots are used as an accent or background pattern while big, bold polka dots placed close together make a dramatic statement demanding attention.

Love Birds And White Polka Dot Mint Wedding Invite
Love Birds And White Polka Dot Mint Wedding Invite by TDSwhite

5. Stripes: Striped patterns seem deceptively simple at first glance, but they can actually be extremely intricate depending on the color, number, thickness and placement of the individual stripes.

Let’s break down striped patterns one criterion at a time. By definition, a designer must use at least two colors in order to create a stripe. The colorful creativity doesn’t stop there. Really, the sky’s the limit. Mother Nature herself used stripes to display the colors of the rainbow. She didn’t forget black and white stripes either — just ask the zebra at your local zoo.

Placement refers to what angle and direction the stripes take in the pattern. They can be horizontal, vertical or diagonal. Thickness of the lines determine the effect the pattern has on the eye. Thin stripes (and relatively more of them) close together are used as a background or accent to help other details stand out whereas large pattern stripes (and relatively fewer of them) become the focal point and draw attention.

Red White And Blue Stripes Monogram Wedding Invite
Red White And Blue Stripes Monogram Wedding Invite by TDSwhite

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